There are certain photographers I enjoy talking to because they inspire me with their passion; Neil is one of those folks. He’s passionate about his work, about conservation and making the idea of the environment relatable to everyone. And then he backs it up with gorgeous photography.

Jeff Campagna, Photo Editor at Smithsonian Magazine

There is indeed an urgent need to reframe the dialogue about our connection to the environment. Neil’s HOME: exhibit advances this ever so important conversation.

Cristina Mittermeier, President at SeaLegacy

In HOME:, we witness one of Canada’s leading conservation photographers make a clear statement about the inextricable link between people and planet, and in response, we gain a better appreciation of our only shared home.

Wade Davis, Explorer in Residence at the National Geographic Society

Positioning nature conservation as a priority has never been more important, and never been more difficult. Osborne has an uncanny ability, with his photographs and his stories of human connection to nature, to shine the spotlight on something most of us take for granted. Our home.

Dave Ireland, Managing Director, ROM Biodiversity at the Royal Ontario Museum

The human element often found in Neil’s photographs is a brilliant way to link ‘us’ to this natural world we are a part of.

Amanda Mohammed, Manager, Communications with Nikon Canada

When Neil’s optic nerve signals his trigger finger to capture an image it begins a generous chain reaction of events that lead to gorgeous art, magazine articles, banners wrapped around buildings, students finding purpose, better friendships, more sea turtles in the ocean, and bigger love for our blue marble home.

Wallace J. Nichols, New York Times Bestselling Author

Neil has contributed to a number of publications I’ve worked on over the last few years and has not only delivered excellent photographic work, but he’s also been an inspiration to many of the colleagues I’ve worked with on creating such content. Neil aims high and hits the target. In some respects, even more impressive than the physical results of his work, are the reactions my colleagues have had to the inspiring messages Neil promotes. He’s a keen advocate of the importance of telling conservation stories through images, and his message both figuratively and literally leaves a mark on his audiences.

Aaron Kylie, Editor, Canadian Geographic Magazine

Dear Neil, me dio mucho placer conocerte y de ver en persona tu arte maravilloso. Tus imagines no son solo photos pero son historias que conmueven y nos hacen ser conscientes del mundo natural y de que cada creatura viviente en este planeta tiene un 'hogar'.

Alessandra Leopardi, Audience Member

Current Exhibit

Title
HOME: An Elephant’s Tale

Dates
May 4th – May 23rd, 2019 (Extended Dates)

VIP Reception by Invitation
May 2nd at 6:00pm–9:00pm with Artist Remarks at 7:00pm

Opening Reception
May 4th at 2:00pm–9:00pm with Artist Remarks at 2:30pm + 4:30pm + 7:30pm

Q&A with The Weather Network’s Michelle Mackey
May 22nd at 7:00pm–8:00pm

Location
Berenson Fine Art
212 Avenue Road
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5R 2J4

Artist Statement

home (noun):
a place where something is typically found or flourishes; a place of origin; a refuge

Positioned at the convergence of documentary and art, the work of Neil Ever Osborne examines the complex, troubled, yet inextricable link between people and planet with the aim of protecting our only shared home.

For more than fifteen years, the Toronto-based conservation photojournalist and visual artist has been capturing compelling images of the earth’s last wild places — many of which remain fragile and in desperate need of protection — from the mountains of the Pacific Northwest to the jungles of Indonesia to the shores of the Falkland Islands.

His new exhibit, HOME:, celebrates wilderness and the underappreciated benefits it provides to all of us. It attempts to demystify the foreignness of such natural worlds, and of nature in general, and replace the very idea of “the environment” with a concept more accessible and relatable to each of us: a healthy home. These images — an elephant’s tail, a mountainous landscape, a venerable grizzly bear in its sanctuary — depict this concept of a shared yet threatened home with honesty and optimism.

Based in his studio in Canada’s largest metropolis, Osborne understands the urgent need to recast the dialogue about the environment in ways that speak also to those who have little firsthand experience of “the wild.” The inherent message is that humanity, so long considered apart from nature, is in fact a part of it.

In the modern world terms such as “environment” and “conservation” have lost their meaning. Despite this, the discussion around these concepts must continue because so many of our social concerns are the direct result of an unhealthy planet. Through a combination of gritty documentary account and aesthetic beauty, Osborne’s work seeks out, locates, and reframes all of this — in a new, nonverbal, yet universal language.

In HOME:, we witness this language at work. Osborne’s images reverberate with echoes from the depths of wilderness — and the encroaching proximity of humanity’s ubiquitous presence — capturing through his unique vision these stories of home.

Recent Media

For Fine Art Sales

Berenson Fine Art
212 Avenue Road
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5R 2J4
416.925.3222
info@berensonart.com
www.berensonart.com